Tuesday, February 24, 2015

ADOBE USERS CAUTION: 2.9M ACCOUNTS HAVE BEEN COMPROMISED

Adobe admits 2.9M customer accounts have been compromised

Summary: Unfortunately, the attack on Adobe also compromised customer names, encrypted credit or debit card numbers, expiration dates, and other information relating to customer orders.
Rachel King

By Rachel King for Between the Lines at ZDNet.com October 3, 2013 -- 20:32 GMT (13:32 PDT)

78 Comments
8 Votes

FULL STORY HERE

Hackers breached Washington state court with Adobe ColdFusion flaw

Adobe announced on Thursday that it has been the target of a major security breach in which sensitive and personal data about millions of its customers have been put at risk.

Brad Arkin, senior director of security for Adobe products and services, explained in a blog post that the attack concerns both customer information and illegal access to source codes for "numerous Adobe products."

A few examples include Adobe Acrobat, ColdFusion, and the ColdFusion Builder. However, as far as the source code is concerned, Adobe assured that there is no "increased risk to customers as a result of this incident."

Adobe officials added that the investigation has not turned up any zero-day attacks either.

Unfortunately, the culprits have obtained access to a large swath of Adobe customer IDs and encrypted passwords.

Arkin specified that removed sensitive information (i.e. names, encrypted credit or debit card numbers, expiration dates, etc.) about approximately 2.9 million Adobe customers.

He added that investigators don't "believe the attackers removed decrypted credit or debit card numbers" from Adobe's systems.

While federal law officials are involved, Adobe stressed that there are some precautions that customers need to take action on now.

Adobe is resetting the passwords on breached Adobe customer IDs, and users will receive an email if they are affected. The software giant is also currently notifying customers whose credit or debit card information was exposed.

Adobe has also promised to offer these customers with the option of enrolling in a one-year complimentary credit monitoring membership where available.

Topics: Security, Cloud, Enterprise Software, Privacy, Software

LINK: http://tinyurl.com/k6sh63k




Some Learning Tools and the Yacker Tracker Sound Measurement Device for Classrooms

Some Learning Tools and the Yacker Tracker Sound Measurement Device for Classrooms
----

 

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

MRI decibel levels?

We've been asked the question, "How many decibels is an MRI"?

According to this page posted at AnaesthesiaUK: "Noise levels above the safe level of 85 decibels can be produced during MRI due to the rapid switching of the gradient coils."

6. High level acoustic noise

Noise levels above the safe level of 85 decibels can be produced during MRI due to the rapid switching of the gradient coils.2,4 The exact magnitude of this noise depends on the sequence of images being collected and the strength of the magnetic field. Staff working in MRI units should protect themselves by remaining in the MR control room during sequence acquisition, or by wearing earplugs should they need to remain in the examination room.
All patients should be given ear protection, regardless of if they are awake or anaesthetised.2,4 The anaesthetist should be aware that high ambient noise levels may mask normal auditory alerts such as monitor alarms or sound the sound of partial airway obstruction, so vigilance and attention to visual
cues is essential.7


References

1. Davis PD, Kenny GNC. Basic Physics and Measurement in Anaesthesia, Fifth Edition.
Butterworth – Heinemann, 2002; 269 – 71

2. Peden CJ, Twigg SJ. Anaesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging. Continuing Education in Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain. 2003; 3: 97 – 101

3. Bricker S. The Anaesthesia Science Viva book, First edition. Greenwich Medical Media Ltd,
2004; 256 - 57

4. Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland. Provision of anaesthetic services in magnetic resonance units. May 2002. Website: www.aagbi.org

5. Roth JL, Nugent m et al. Patient monitoring during Magnetic resonance imaging.
Anaesthesiology. 1985; 62: 80 – 83

6. Taber KH, Thompson J et al. Invasive pressure monitoring of patients during magnetic resonance imaging. Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia. 1993; 40: 1092 – 5

7. Sesay M, Tauzin-Fin P et al. Audibility of anaesthesia alarms during magnetic resonance imaging: should we be alarmed? European Journal of Anaesthesiology. 2009; 26: 117 – 122